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Louis HEBERT

Louis HEBERT

Male 1575 - 1627  (52 years)

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  • Name Louis HEBERT 
    Relationshipwith Brian Mark BUSSIERE
    Born 1575  La Maison Mortier D'or, Rue St-Honore, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 Jan 1627  Québec, Québec Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 25 Jan 1627  Cimitière des Recollets, Québec, Québec Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 4 siblings 
    Person ID I1944  Bussiere Robinson | Brian's ancestors
    Last Modified 10 Apr 2004 

    Father Nicolas HEBERT,   b. 1547, St-Germain-Des-Pres, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1600, St-Germain-Des-Pres, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Mother Jacqueline PAJOT,   b. Abt 1551, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1580, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 29 years) 
    Married 1564  Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F568  Group Sheet

    Family Marie ROLLET,   b. 1580, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. May 1649, Québec, Québec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 13 Jun 1602  Abbaye de St-Germain-des-Pres, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Joseph Guillaume HEBERT,   b. 1604, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1640  (Age 35 years)
    +2. Marie Guillemette HEBERT,   b. 1606, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1684, L'église de l'Hotel Dieu, Québec, Québec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     3. Anne HEBERT,   b. 1600, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Guillaume HEBERT,   b. Abt 1603, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 30 Jan 2016 
    Family ID F567  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1575 - La Maison Mortier D'or, Rue St-Honore, Paris, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 13 Jun 1602 - Abbaye de St-Germain-des-Pres, Paris, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 Jan 1627 - Québec, Québec Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 25 Jan 1627 - Cimitière des Recollets, Québec, Québec Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Hebert.bmp
    Hebert.bmp
    Louis Hebert
    Louis Hebert
    Statue Quebec City

  • Notes 
    • Louis Hebert has the distinction of being the first settler in the New World. He also has the distinction of planting the first wheat. He cleared the land given to him by Champlain. He had come twice to Port-Royal, Acadie, but he definitely settled at Quebec in 1617 with his wife, Marie Rollet, and his children. Louis died of a very bad fall. He was listed as a druggist, the same profession that his father practiced in the Royal House of the Queen Catherine de Medicis. They disembarked in Acadie in May 1604. This was at Saint-Marie.

      And, it was during the winter of 1606/07 that we see that the ordre de bon temps was formed, its principal members being: Poutrincourt, Champlain; Pontgravé; Champdoré, the carpenter; Daniel Hay, the surgeon; young Biencourt, L'Escarbot, lawyer; and, of course, Hébert.

      Port Royal was abandoned in 1607 due to the Des Monts company's financial problems.

      Engaged by Champlain in 1616 and offered splendid terms (he was to be maintained for three years and receive a salary of 200 crowns a year) to go to Quebec as a resident physician and surgeon for the Company. Later after he had sold his shop and house in Paris and taken his wife and family to Honfleur for embarkation; he was then informed by the Boyer element who were then in charge, that Champlain had exceeded his authority and the terms of the agreement would not be honored. He would instead only receive one hundred crowns a year for the 3 years, and after the term of the arrangement expired he must serve the Company exclusively for nothing. He must never dabble in the fur trade and if he became a raiser of produce he must sell everything to the Company at prices they would fix.... He realized he had no choice having disposed of his shop and house...He signed the scandalously unfair paper and took his worried family aboard the ship for the New World....

      On April 11 1617, they left Honfluer aboard the Saint-Etienne (captain Normand Morin) and arrived in Quebec on 15 July. Only five other French families were to follow them on similar voyages to New France in the next 10 years.

      In the spring of 1617 Louis became the first private individual to receive a grant of land in the New World from the French Government.

      Upon his arrival in Quebec, Louis selected ten acres on a site that is today located in the city of Quebec between Ste. Famille and Couillard Streets on the grounds of the Seminary of Quebec and Basilica of Notre Dame. Soon afterwards, Louis started clearing out some old-growth forest so he could plant crops. This put him in conflict with the fur trading company, who was strongly opposed to deforestation for farming because of its adverse effect on the fur business. Louis had to work very hard, doing all the work by hand. The fur trading company wouldn't even let him import a plough from France. On this land, Louis, his son Guillaume, and an unnamed servant with the help of only an ace, a pick and a spade, broke the soil and raised corn, winter wheat, beans, peas, and livestock including cattle, swine, and fowl. He also established an apple orchard and a vineyard. He overcame the hardships and became the first Canadian to support his family from the soil. He imported from France the first ox to pull a plough in Canada, but unfortunately, the first plough did not arrive until a year after his death.

      In 1621, Louis' hard work was finally recognized as having been of great service to the colony: for being the physician and surgeon; for being its principal provider of food; and, for having fostered good relationships with the natives. When a proper legal system was inaugurated in Quebec, he was appointed Procurator to the King, which allowed him to personally intervene in matters in the name of the King.

      In 1621, his daughter Guillemette married Guillaume Couillard who joined the family business.

      In 1623, Louis became the first "Seigneur" of New France when he was granted the noble fief of "Sault-au-Matelot". In 1626 he was further granted "le fief de la riviere, St Charles" in recognition of his meritorious service with which went the title of Sieur d
      Epinay.

      On January 25, 1627, within weeks of a bad fall on ice, Louis Hébert died, at Quebec, at the age of 52.